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Discussion Starter #1
Jim Collins posted this info on the Gear Page....this is much faster than the time consuming bit by bit claw adjustments to find equal string tension I was using:zzz: ....he mentions using a single ply trem back plate as a thickness guage, I used a .060" feeler gauge on both my strats wich gave a full step rise in pitch when pulling up on the trem arm.

[Originally Posted by Jim Collins
It is because of the string gauge.

If you like your bridge to be flush with the body, tighten the springs. If you want your bridge to float, you'll have to equalize the tension between the springs and the strings.

You will need to adjust the intonation. You probably won't need to adjust the truss rod. I've never had to, when going from the stock .009s to the .010s that I use. However, check it.

If you want the bridge to float, remove the spring claw cavity cover. If it is a single ply cover, it is just about the thickness you'll need for what comes next. If it is a three ply cover, it might be too thick. I'll continue as if the cover is a single ply.

Place the cover between the bridge and the top of the guitar body. You are going to tighten the spring claw screws until the cover is securely grabbed by the bridge plate. Now, tune to concert pitch. Make sure the strings are properly stretched. Adjust the action and the intonation, all with that cover in place.

Once the guitar is in tune, with the strings properly stretched, remove that cover. The pitch of the guitar will raise. Do not retune. Instead, adjust the two spring claw screws so that the two E strings are in tune. It is okay if the claw is crooked. What you've done, here, is equalize the tension between the strings, when the guitar is tuned to concert pitch, and the springs, when the bridge is set to float at the height you set (the thickness of that cover).

If you set the bridge flush with the body, use five springs. If you want the bridge to float, so you can pull up on the bar, use three or four springs. (With .010s, I prefer four, but you're the one playing it.)]

:bow:
 

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There is a similar method to float your floyd.


Cut a block of wood that fits between your rear rout cavity and the spring stem of your floyd (between the back side, not the claw side). Make sure that the block holds your bridge in the upright position with little claw tension and the strings tuned up.

With strings in tune and the block in place, set the guitar on your lap (or where ever you like - the main thing is that the block of wood is facing the floor) and tighten the claw until the block of wood falls out.

Done the tension is equal. New springs need to be worked in as do the strings, but the size of the block shouldn't change for any one guitar.

Keep the block in your guitar case as it also comes in handy if you break a string (provided you leave the back cover off) and have to play without a full set or change gauges.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I've heard of the block method, but Jim's post uses the claw screws to retune the guitar to perfect pitch, with the block method you could easily over-tension one of the claw srews to get the block to fall out.
 
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