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Actually I would like to cancel that reference. I wrote that before getting the voicemaster back .After more than a month I got a phonecall saying that the tubes where all right. I said .. Thats nice but what about the guts ? You know like the forty five year old capacitors? Well he had not even removed the chassis so I just arranged to pick it up with nothing done. Does anyone know a real amp tech around here? Thanks
 

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Actually I would like to cancel that reference. I wrote that before getting the voicemaster back .After more than a month I got a phonecall saying that the tubes where all right. I said .. Thats nice but what about the guts ? You know like the forty five year old capacitors? Well he had not even removed the chassis so I just arranged to pick it up with nothing done. Does anyone know a real amp tech around here? Thanks
Sorry to hear this and thanks for the update. Could you go to that post I linked above and edit or update? Thanks
 

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I have a Mesa Boogie Mark V in for service at Doctronics. So far communications have been good and diagnostic/estimate turnaround has been reasonable. So, if my issue is solved when I get it back, I'll be satisfied. I'll give an update when I get it back.
 

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I have a Mesa Boogie Mark V in for service at Doctronics. So far communications have been good and diagnostic/estimate turnaround has been reasonable. So, if my issue is solved when I get it back, I'll be satisfied. I'll give an update when I get it back.
If he can fix a Mk V, my hat is off to him. That is one complicated amp. I do my own repairs but I think if I bought one of those, I would be tempted to sell it after 4 years and 11 months, even if I loved it. That said, they are extremely reliable amps and I hope yours gets sorted out.

I am a Mesa fan and I like the insides of my LSS. Even the Roadster was tolerable to work on, just hard to remove the chassis without another set of hands.
 

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If he can fix a Mk V, my hat is off to him. That is one complicated amp. I do my own repairs but I think if I bought one of those, I would be tempted to sell it after 4 years and 11 months, even if I loved it. That said, they are extremely reliable amps and I hope yours gets sorted out.

I am a Mesa fan and I like the insides of my LSS. Even the Roadster was tolerable to work on, just hard to remove the chassis without another set of hands.
I have an LSS too. That is my backup amp and a great amp too. The Mark V was having intermittent channel relay issues where switching back to clean channel, the sound would drop out (no signal). Needless to say, very problematic when performing a gig. I was told by Doctronics the issue is diagnosed and waiting for parts. So, update is forthcoming.
 

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Please dont think that I am saying this shop is no good . Having dealt with Ray a couple of times it seems to me that he is better at modular stuff .. ie modern keyboards and PCB amps etc. He maybe fine with a Mesa amp but what I am looking for is someone that really understands an old point to point amp. Thanks for some ideas ..Gonna give SM a call. Rabbit
 

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Please dont think that I am saying this shop is no good . Having dealt with Ray a couple of times it seems to me that he is better at modular stuff .. ie modern keyboards and PCB amps etc. He maybe fine with a Mesa amp but what I am looking for is someone that really understands an old point to point amp. Thanks for some ideas ..Gonna give SM a call. Rabbit
If he has the skills to fix PCB stuff, then older, non PCB amps should be a breeze.
 

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If he has the skills to fix PCB stuff, then older, non PCB amps should be a breeze.
I agree, especially for repairs. If you want someone to mod an old tag-board amp (there are very few true PTP amps after probably 1950, but I digress), intimate knowledge would be nice. But not for repairs, those types of amps are pretty simple.
 

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If he has the skills to fix PCB stuff, then older, non PCB amps should be a breeze.
Yeah you are right! He Should ! And by the way nobody fixes PCB stuff ..They only replace whole components ! When your TV breaks down do you phone a repair man? No . You just buy a new one.
 

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Yeah you are right! He Should ! And by the way nobody fixes PCB stuff ..They only replace whole components ! When your TV breaks down do you phone a repair man? No . You just buy a new one.
I thought we were talking about amps? Are you saying PCB amps can't be fixed? Or high-end PCB audio and broadcast video equipment?

Crap, I've been dreaming my way through a whole career, like that dude in Dallas. Wonder where I'll be when I wake up. :rolleyes:
 
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Yeah you are right! He Should ! And by the way nobody fixes PCB stuff ..They only replace whole components ! When your TV breaks down do you phone a repair man? No . You just buy a new one.
Not true...you can replace individual components on PCBs....have done it myself on a few occasions on older tube and transistor amps. Certainly a lot easier to replace parts on amps with a tag board or point-to-point wired amp.

Some amp techs won't work on PCB stuff though, and depending on the price of the amp, it may not be worth the bench fees.

Lots of cool vintage amps with PCBs - eg. Marshalls, Ampegs, etc
 

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Most tech's who don't get to cherry pick will be working on more pcb amps than not. Most modern tube amps are pcboard based.
It's one thing to prefer not to work on circuit board amps, but many 'so-called' techs are unable.
I would question the skills of anyone who can work on vintage tube stuff but can't work on circuit boards, in the same way as I would question the skills of anyone that can work on circuit boards but not vintage tube gear. In either case, some fundamentals must be missing.
 

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Most tech's who don't get to cherry pick will be working on more pcb amps than not. Most modern tube amps are pcboard based.
It's one thing to prefer not to work on circuit board amps, but many 'so-called' techs are unable.
I would question the skills of anyone who can work on vintage tube stuff but can't work on circuit boards, in the same way as I would question the skills of anyone that can work on circuit boards but not vintage tube gear. In either case, some fundamentals must be missing.
Do you know anyone like that?

I know old amp guys that only work on tubes and turret boards. I don't blame them - that's what they started with and that's what they are comfortable with. If they stay as busy as they want to be doing that, no harm no foul.

I started with solid state PCB equipment, tubes were pretty well gone in the early 80s. But because of my own interest, I learned tubes (and still have some things to learn). But in reality, both tubes and turret boards are much easier than SS PCB stuff is, so I find becoming 'backward compatible' is easier than that old amp tech learning PCB and SS tech. I can only imagine some techs aren't interested in learning the necessary things to understand how tubes work, mechanically I don't see any roadblocks to work on the older equipment. I refuse to work on car audio - not that the tech is hard, I am sick of climbing under dashboards and into trunks. Won't do it on my own vehicles - I'll pay someone else to do it (that's how much I hate it).

Speaking of cars, I guess amp teching is similar to car teching. If you can work on a new microprocessor-controlled model with an engine bay crammed to the gills with plastic and pipes and wiring, opening up the hood on a 1968 Chevy pickup, which you can literally climb into with the engine still there, and working on a carburated 327 is pretty easy. You may have to learn what points are or how a timing light works, but if you've figured out how to flash an EEPROM, that shouldn't be too hard.
 
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But where do I plug the code-reader in? ;)
Sorry if I was not clear about preferences vs. abilities. People can choose to specialize however they like and I have no problem with that.
 

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But where do I plug the code-reader in? ;)
Sorry if I was not clear about preferences vs. abilities. People can choose to specialize however they like and I have no problem with that.
....and I didn't mean to appear critical. Sorry if I was. I was just commenting on the direction of technology as I see it. Going backwards always seems easier than going forwards. I grew up in the rotary dial era and I bet I don't get 10% of the advantages out of my smartphone that every 12 year old probably does. My mom is convinced she can't even use a computer although she plays piano and drives a vehicle, both harder to do, IMO. Old dogs, new tricks thing. And when I was 18, I said I'd never be like this.


Oooh yea, get the hell of my lawn!!!!
 
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