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Discussion Starter #3
I've always steered clear of Jags because I always considered them 'hipster' guitars, but lately I'm digging them.

I'm finding myself preferring 0ff-beat and funky guitars.

Did you find the fret spacing to be a bit weird at first?
 

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I've always steered clear of Jags because I always considered them 'hipster' guitars, but lately I'm digging them.

I'm finding myself preferring 0ff-beat and funky guitars.

Did you find the fret spacing to be a bit weird at first?

Yeah , I am a die hard tele guy and still like to dabble in the offsets . I love surf music so it fits , I haven't found the spacing weird or anything and I actually prefer it to my Jazzmaster which I just sold here.

I also have 2 Fender Duo Sonics, a 1966 Fender Musicmaster and had an Eastwood Airline . All offset guitars
 

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I was always curious about them since the first time I saw one. Bob Dylan was brandishing one on the inside cover of the Blonde on Blonde album. He did a few brief solos on some of the bluesier tracks (e.g., Leopard-skin Pillbox Hat, Obviously Five Believers), and whatever the engineering involved was, the tone was icepick-through-the-forehead shrill. I didn't actually like it, but it did make me curious.

So, when someone was selling a Jag pickup locally, with a torn coil, I had to have it. I rewound it, and installed it on a cheap European Fender wannabe that I think was called Jaguar (number of years back, and I took the decal off when modifying the headstock, so I forget what it was). Interesting pickup. More or less a Strat, although the dimensions are slightly different. The "comb" is what makes it interesting. It is lightly coupled to the underside of the polepieces, and then routes that magnetic field up the sides of the coil. So, think of P90, whose side magnets are L-shaped, and don't actually touch the keeper bar, but come close enough to influence it.

The side routing makes it a little ballsier than a Strat PU, and a smidgen less sensitive to hum.
 

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my music teacher back in the 60`s rocked a Jag, and I've been GAS`n for one ever since. Not many around, I never did find one. I do have a blacktop HH Jag however. I like the feel of the shorter scale, very comfortable. The pickups were lacking flavor, but I switched them out to Vineham Humdogs (P90 in a HB format) and it now sounds wonderful.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
my music teacher back in the 60`s rocked a Jag, and I've been GAS`n for one ever since. Not many around, I never did find one. I do have a blacktop HH Jag however. I like the feel of the shorter scale, very comfortable. The pickups were lacking flavor, but I switched them out to Vineham Humdogs (P90 in a HB format) and it now sounds wonderful.
There seems to be more Jags around now, especially with Fender now having the American Professional ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah , I am a die hard tele guy and still like to dabble in the offsets . I love surf music so it fits , I haven't found the spacing weird or anything and I actually prefer it to my Jazzmaster which I just sold here.

I also have 2 Fender Duo Sonics, a 1966 Fender Musicmaster and had an Eastwood Airline . All offset guitars
Jazzmasters are cool, but I find they can feel big and cumbersome.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Exactly my thoughts as well ! Even though it is the same scale as a strat or tele , it just felt cumbersome to me . The Jaguar is not like this .
Yeah, I think it's because the body length on Jazzmasters is a bit longer past the bridge, so even though it's regular scale length, there's the illusion of it actually being longer.

I find a lot of Music Man guitars feel like short scale guitars because there's less body length after the bridge, even though they're regular scale length.
 
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