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Discussion Starter #1
just have some technical questions...

is there anywhere where i can find info or get people to share info with me about:

a) what the different gauge strings do.. what's good for which gauge (e.g tapping, sweeping etc)
b) good amp settings
c) what the tone dials do and why are there 4 dials
d) what's a reason to use the pick up switch to isolate certain pick ups etc.
 

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higher gauge strings usually have a thicker tone, but are harder to play. If you guitar was set-up with lighter strings, and you move to a heavier gauge, the increased tension will require you to adjust the "truss rod" of the neck to compensate for the bow in the neck, due to the increased tension. You can google "truss rod adjustment" to find lots of information on that if you need to. Otherwise, if you have a very expensive guitar, or are not comfortable doing this (even though its not really that hard, and you wont mess anything up if you adjust in very small increments and don't force anything) take it to a guitar shop to get adjusted. Its only like 15$ here or something

Good amp settings...Well it all depends on the guitar im running. As a basic rule, I usually put my EQ all at 5 (middle) and start from there. Some other people should be able to help you more with this. What amp are you using and what guitar?

The tone dials cut off high end I think...if you roll them down you get a "fatter" tone.

d) lets use a strat with 3 single coils for example. The neck pickup, due to its position on the guitar, will have a rounder, fatter tone. The bridge pickup, since it is close to the bridge, will have a more....chunky? tone...

take an acoustic guitar and strum near the neck...the sound is fuller with more lower frequencies. Now, strum right near the bridge, and the sound will be thin and weak. The neck pickup is traditionally used more for soloing on an electric guitar, whereas the bridge pickup is traditionally more for rhythm. This is all relative though, as a lot of time I use my bridge for soloing haha.
 

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just have some technical questions...

is there anywhere where i can find info or get people to share info with me about:

a) what the different gauge strings do.. what's good for which gauge (e.g tapping, sweeping etc)
b) good amp settings
c) what the tone dials do and why are there 4 dials
d) what's a reason to use the pick up switch to isolate certain pick ups etc.
A). String gauges are a personal taste thing. If you're starting out I would recommend the following:

10, 13, 17, 26, 36, 46 (standard light gauge)

Until you've been playing for awhile it really won't make a huge difference.

B). Different amp settings will yield different sounds. What type of sounds are you trying to achieve?

C). Different amps have different controls. What model and make of amp do you have? This will allow us to better advise you.

D). Again depending on the type and quantity of pickups you have, the switch allows you to select pickup combinations that will greatly affect the tone. The pickups closest to the bridge will tend to have a sharper sound with more treble. The pickups closest to the neck will have a more mellow and warmer sound.
 

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just have some technical questions...

is there anywhere where i can find info or get people to share info with me about:

a) what the different gauge strings do.. what's good for which gauge (e.g tapping, sweeping etc)
b) good amp settings
c) what the tone dials do and why are there 4 dials
d) what's a reason to use the pick up switch to isolate certain pick ups etc.
Everyone has pretty much covered everything, I'll just add little bits.

a) Tapping and sweeping can be done on any string guage... tapping is a lot easier with the action (string height) lower. Lower action = harder to bend and do vibrato though... you have to find the height and guage you prefer. Comes with time and experience.

I do agree with Milkman to start with 10's... and stay tuned in standard. This way you'll build some good finger strength and if you decide you want to go down to 9's you'll be able to perform bending and vibrato in your sleep.

b) Good amp settings... "good" can only be defined by the player. Everyone has their own personal taste in tone. Let us know the type of music you're playing and amp you're using and we'll throw you in the right direction.

c) Depends on the amp which has been stated. I think the basic controls that all amps do (or should) have are: bass, mid, treble, gain and volume.

Bass gives you more low end (more oomph, hah), mids kind of brightens up the tone, treble gives you more high end (if you think metal, when you're palm muting something it will give you more of a scratchy sound), gain adds more dirt to your sound (ie: takes you from clean to overdriven tones, or low overdrive to high gain overdrive), and volume... well, yeah.

d) Milkman summed this one up pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
wow thanks .. i;m just glad people don;t get all upset and point me to google haha..

i just like hearing different people's advice.. it;s better then a guy sittin there writting essays about this stuff in technical jargin u don't necessarily understdand.

but i am and still am researching on all this but this helps a lot ; >

the music i play is uaually christian based.. but i would categorize them into the alternative/rock style..

and i am trying to learn Canon Rock for my wedding ; > but i dunno if i have enough time to learn to sweep properly before then..
 
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