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L&M sells a 4 piece plexi shield along with a couple of sound absorbing panels. I have two and they work great.
 

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Why would it be hard on the speaker?
I was reading a thread somewhere asking which way to lay an amp down when transporting it. Ted Weber had told someone and was quoted to say the amp should be transported with the face down (magnet up). The reason being if it's the other way the speaker will be bumped to move in an unnatural way that can potentially damage the speaker. I understood it to mean the speaker cone is not designed to move very far back into the basket (towards the magnet) but is designed to move out of the basket or away from the magnet. So I am taking this info and applying it to the idea of laying the speaker face up (the way Ted Weber said not to transport it) as potentially being bad for it. Maybe, maybe not...

Edit: I would assume if the amp can be transported upright on it's feet (the way it would sit on the floor) that would be the best way. But if it is going into your trunk or space it tight it may have to be laid down. Then it should be face down.
 

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I don't no 12 watts in a big room like a legion and your band mate has trouble with volume. Maybe he is in the wrong game. Ear plugs would be a good option for your band mate.
 

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My preference is not to mic, if I can get away with it. Running the guitar through FOH just adds to the amount of guitar in the mix - it's all cumulative. I rather get all that guitar level from my amp on stage if I can --- unless I need to use mic/reinforcement for coverage or the size of the audience, which happens a lot less than half the time.

As far as stage volume, it's pretty much dependent on the drummer. I've played in some bands that weren't that loud on stage, and I've played in some that were pretty crazy loud. I prefer to start quieter and work our way up there through the night. IMO, the better the drummer, the more dynamic he can be without beating the shit outa his kit. If I'm in a situation where a 30 - 35 watt amp won't cut it on stage, it's probably not the right situation for me anymore.
 
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I prefer to mic everything and keep stage volumes to a minimum.

We used to side wash our guitar cabs, aimed so that when you were at the mic, they were not aimed at you, but when you took one step back from the mic, you were right in the sweet spot.

Putting everything in the FOH mix is the only way I know of to ensure people in all parts of the room hear a complete mix.

Guitars cabs are very directional. If your guitar isn’t coming out of the mains there’s a very good chance some people are getting too much guitar and others can’t hear you at all.

This is also why mixing in stereo with wide panning is not great for most people in the audience.

These are just my opinions of course.

Modelers and IEMs take the idea to the next level.
 

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IME, it's dependent on the size of the room and audience. If I'm barely loud enough to keep up with the drummer and I'm already just about too loud for the room, mic'ing isn't going to help. I don't want to turn down have to hear my amp through my monitors. And to me, in these smaller rooms, with the amps being heard off the stage, that gives the band the appearance of having some stereo spread and not point source. In most of the cases, we are also mixing off the stage and the KISS principle applies.

Of course, all of this goes out the window if we're in a large enough place to require better coverage and a dedicated soundman. That happens less and less every year, though.
 

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This and bring your amp volume to as low as you can.
OR make sure there is none of your guitar in the monitors. Like either or. This avoids mutliple out of phase sources of the same sound (which makes for comb filtering and general muddiness making you not able to hear what you are playing.

My personal preference is to have nothing amplified going through the monitors, ideally just kick and vocals (barring anything direct only like unamped keys, or acoustic instruments). Then contrary to modern 'best practise' put the amps behind the drummer vs out front.

This all assumes standard wedge monitors - if using in ears then none of this applies.
 

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Pointing speakers is vital, but lots of bands spend endless hours on their PA and ignore their amps. Regardless of my volume, but to accommodate low stage volume, I preferred a combo on/with an extension cab in my last band. The extension cab was often pointed over/back at the drummer who would complain about too little guitar in the monitors, the combo was most often angled and tilted to side wash (or at least partly so) the stage. If I mic'd, and I generally did, I liked an Apex harmonica mic since it hung from a cord over the amp facing the speaker, was designed to take massive volume (if need be) close up, and seemed EQ'd for the purpose. It's an odd choice but it worked, built like a tank too. On small stages a mic stand in front of the amp is just one more thing over which to trip. If I was using a two amp system the second amp would be pointing slightly off axis with the first, no extension, almost full-time clean.
 
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