The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to get my 79 mesa serviced but I'm not sure If should I'm a little worried something will happen. I was told to get in contact with Paul Gamache from Moncton. Have any of you dealt with him if so is he really certified by mesa like I'm told. I've talked to him all ready he seems nice enough I have a quote of around $400-$500 that's every thing done over caps,filters ,tubes ect . But I've never done this before is that a good price or too much what do you guys think? Thanks in advance Jared



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,167 Posts
Well is there anything "wrong" with it? Exactly how much do you need to get replaced?
Generally, people will charge for bench time by the hour, and the estimate will be based on the bench time required to do all the things requested. You can shorten the bench time by reducing the time the repair person has to spend disassembling and reassembling. Takje the amp out of the cab, bring it to the guy, find out what really needs replacement or tweaking, and then talk price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Well is there anything "wrong" with it? Exactly how much do you need to get replaced?
Generally, people will charge for bench time by the hour, and the estimate will be based on the bench time required to do all the things requested. You can shorten the bench time by reducing the time the repair person has to spend disassembling and reassembling. Takje the amp out of the cab, bring it to the guy, find out what really needs replacement or tweaking, and then talk price.
Well um it quite once when I first got it a cap went . The tech that worked on it then said the filter caps needed done. I know the tubes aren't a matched set witch I'd like to get matching. I haven't really had any problems after that witch is why I'm wondering . Or should I just buy a new set of tubes


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well is there anything "wrong" with it? Exactly how much do you need to get replaced?
Generally, people will charge for bench time by the hour, and the estimate will be based on the bench time required to do all the things requested. You can shorten the bench time by reducing the time the repair person has to spend disassembling and reassembling. Takje the amp out of the cab, bring it to the guy, find out what really needs replacement or tweaking, and then talk price.
Bench time o crap yikes


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,167 Posts
It's no different than getting your car serviced. The mechanic has a blue book that lists time required to change or repair this or that, and the price estimate they give you is based on the standard time required.

Filter caps are pivotal in the amp functioning properly, since if the caps are off spec, then the power is not arriving at the tubes properly. In some respects, replacing can be cheaper than troubleshooting, since detective work also takes time. On the other hand, it takes time to replace parts too, and if they didn't need replacing, that's both time and parts you pay for.

If you walk in with a fistful of brand new caps, and ask for the new ones to replace the old ones, that's what the bench time is for.
As for the tubes, some folks actually like misatched tubes. Some amps allow for tubes to be biased individually, but I have no idea if the Boogies are like that.

Again, I have to ask, what's wrong with it? If the tone suits you just fine, but you need to be able to depend opn the amp powering up properly each and every time yoou ask it to, then power-supply caps may be all that's needed. If the basing of the existing tubes is off, that's another thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's no different than getting your car serviced. The mechanic has a blue book that lists time required to change or repair this or that, and the price estimate they give you is based on the standard time required.

Filter caps are pivotal in the amp functioning properly, since if the caps are off spec, then the power is not arriving at the tubes properly. In some respects, replacing can be cheaper than troubleshooting, since detective work also takes time. On the other hand, it takes time to replace parts too, and if they didn't need replacing, that's both time and parts you pay for.

If you walk in with a fistful of brand new caps, and ask for the new ones to replace the old ones, that's what the bench time is for.
As for the tubes, some folks actually like misatched tubes. Some amps allow for tubes to be biased individually, but I have no idea if the Boogies are like that.

Again, I have to ask, what's wrong with it? If the tone suits you just fine, but you need to be able to depend opn the amp powering up properly each and every time yoou ask it to, then power-supply caps may be all that's needed. If the basing of the existing tubes is off, that's another thing.
Well it's gonna sound stupid but I don't know. Every one that played it claimed that it was missing something. My friend goes on and on about how it should be capt . I honestly know nothing bout tube amps before this I was using a fender front man 15r. I know when you shut it down it once and a wile make a pop. I can't get it to break up. I'm not sure if that's because it's so big . All I know is I said I want that and I got it for doing work for some one. It sat in his basement for a few years


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,726 Posts
filter caps can be expensive, I know of a recap job on a Sessionman that cost over $400

that may have included tubes too though, so that would be in line with your quote

that Boogie probably has a lot of caps. If the original tech said you needed caps, they surely need to be replaced now!


the plus is, that is probably built better than the new Boogies. I bet it's handwired, no PCB = more durable
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
filter caps can be expensive, I know of a recap job on a Sessionman that cost over $400

that may have included tubes too though, so that would be in line with your quote

that Boogie probably has a lot of caps. If the original tech said you needed caps, they surely need to be replaced now!


the plus is, that is probably built better than the new Boogies. I bet it's handwired, no PCB = more durable
I'd open her up but I'd be too scared of braking something

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,726 Posts
well, if you got it fully serviced, it would probably be good for at least another 10 years, except possibly power tubes if you use it a lot

owning a good tube amp costs money

especially an old tube amp. I'd get it overhauled, if it was mine

I keep a solid state amp around to noodle on, to save my tube amps. I can leave it on all day & not wear out any tubes :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
filter caps can be expensive, I know of a recap job on a Sessionman that cost over $400

that may have included tubes too though, so that would be in line with your quote

that Boogie probably has a lot of caps. If the original tech said you needed caps, they surely need to be replaced now!


the plus is, that is probably built better than the new Boogies. I bet it's handwired, no PCB = more durable
I know basically hand wired and caps



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,726 Posts
nice!!

do NOT stick your fingers in there

if that guy is an authorized Mesa tech, he can go thru the circuit & check voltages etc vs the schematic as well

what is it, a Mark III?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
nice!!

do NOT stick your fingers in there

if that guy is an authorized Mesa tech, he can go thru the circuit & check voltages etc vs the schematic as well

what is it, a Mark III?
Mark 2 a 1979 and no I'd end up breaking it. I have the schematic here I actually have two copy's


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,971 Posts
filter caps can be expensive, I know of a recap job on a Sessionman that cost over $400

that may have included tubes too though, so that would be in line with your quote

that Boogie probably has a lot of caps. If the original tech said you needed caps, they surely need to be replaced now!


the plus is, that is probably built better than the new Boogies. I bet it's handwired, no PCB = more durable
Good thing no one bet you, eh?

Except for the mod'd Fenders, anything RS built from scratch has always had his etched PCB's and he or his staff handwired them and everything else on his amps (flying leads, etc.). They are still this way.

The Mk V still has a lot of handwiring, as well as ribbon cables. They are a beast inside, but that's how you get a tube amp to do all the things it does. I can't think of a more flexible tube amp available. And still made in Petaluma and still as reliable as any amp made.

The thing about PCB's being less reliable is just internet BS. There are cheap/unreliable PCB amps and their are cheap/unreliable tag board amps. The commonality is cheap/unreliable, not PCB/unreliable.

As to the OP's question, I'm not sure if the tubes are mismatched. The Mk II did allow the use of two different types of power tubes, so the outer pair may be different from the inner pair. But that isn't the definition of 'mismatched'. You probably just need the filter caps replaced. You can buy and install your own tubes and save some money there. The Tubestore will sell you a whole set or just the ones you want for that specific amp. Probably a lot cheaper than paying an extra markup to your local tech, IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,726 Posts
Are the Mesa Boogie amps all "plug and play" with their own power tubes?

or is it still recommended to get a tech to look at it?

something this old, I would definitely get a thorough look thru done if it were mine
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top