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Interesting the effect the magnets of the single coils had when they passed by
 

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Very cool. I've often wondered what a pickup sould sound like closer to the 12th fret. I thought of burying a small pickup in the fretboard, (like Taylor does on their older acoustics) but right at the 121th fret. Obviously it would only work for playing below that fret. This vid shows roughly how that would sound. Thanks for that tip!
 

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this should be mandatory viewing for all those "pick up height" fanatics who measure in the hundreds of an inch.

G.
 

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Very cool. I've often wondered what a pickup sould sound like closer to the 12th fret. I thought of burying a small pickup in the fretboard, (like Taylor does on their older acoustics) but right at the 121th fret. Obviously it would only work for playing below that fret. This vid shows roughly how that would sound. Thanks for that tip!
Onamac pickups made 24 pickups (blade style) to go into a special run of Billy Gibbons telecasters with only a bridge pickup visible. The 24th fret is also the neck pickup!! Hidden under the fretboard.

I'll have to ask Kerry for pics. Must have been cool.
 

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I'd like to make my strat sound like a Les Paul!
 
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That was cool to watch no? I wish someone would make a guitar where you could move around the pickups like on a slider or something.
They did. It was the clear lucite Dan Armstrong guitar which had a sort of rack for sliding the pickup around. Actually, let me correct that. The earliest ones were clear and allowed the user to slide different pickups in and out. Later wooden-body models allowed for the single pickup to slide forward and backward, for different placements.

Rick Turner's guitars, that he started building for LIndsay Buckingham, have a pickup that can be rotated to different angles and orientations, although you can't move it forwards or backwards.

One of the things I have had success with in the past was using a higher-value compensating cap on the volume pot. Fender has traditionally included such caps to allow upper treble to essentially bypass the volume control, and compensate for loading when the volume pot is turned down (the cap has no effect when the volume is up full). Such caps are often in the range of a few hundred picofarads. I find if I use something in the range of 1500pf (.0015uf) or so,an interesting thing happens, when you turn the volume down to around 7 or 8, you keep the mids and treble, but lose much of the bass. Actual attenuation of volume really only becomes apparent around 4 or lower.

I do this to a bridge humbucker for chicken-pickin. What's nice about this is that, unlike coil-cancelling, you don't lose any hum rejection. You don't get any upper glassiness that wasn't there to begin with, but it behaves like a bass cut. It also makes pinky swells a little more dramatic as not only the volume fades in but so does the "body".
 

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The Gibson Grabber has a sliding pup.

Beat me to it. I think the Grabber was the earliest example of this idea. It didn't sell.... except to Gene Simmons who had a good few of them.



Coil split/coil tap?
Or series/parallel switch (less noise, sounds about the same).

I repaired the seemingly dead neck (IIRC) pickup in my friend's Ric 650 by figuring out that only 1 of 2 coils was dead, bypassing that coil and wiring it up as a single coil. Sounded great (kinda Stratish).
 

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Did anyone else notice that most of the time Johan was picking very close to the bridge on the LP & over the middle pup on the Strat? Right hand position also has an influence on tone.
 
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