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If Godin would put binding on all their fret boards I bet they would sell way more guitars. Their guitars are so nice looking and well styled, but the unbound neck looks too plain in comparison.

I will definitely be checking out the above guitar and hoping the neck isn't too skinny.

TG
 

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I'd love to try one of those with a Bigsby.
 

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If Godin would put binding on all their fret boards I bet they would sell way more guitars. Their guitars are so nice looking and well styled, but the unbound neck looks too plain in comparison.

I will definitely be checking out the above guitar and hoping the neck isn't too skinny.

TG
I think this is due, in part, to their desire to keep costs down. I do agree it looks great, though.
I'd love to try one of those with a Bigsby.
I think there was one in the NAMM video, if memory serves.

Edit: here it is. I love how enthusiastic Robert Godin is.
 

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Very nice guitar. Does it come in red?
 

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I think this is due, in part, to their desire to keep costs down. I do agree it looks great, though.
There is a great video (which I cannot find of course!) that claims the "more money to produce" argument is simply the end result of marketing product-line differentiation. Yes, the most expensive models tend to have bound necks but this isn't really because of added manufacturing costs. When you think about it, we are talking about two pieces of plastic glued to the edge of the fret board.

I just find the Godin stuff looks so nice and has a great number of styles and finishes. They are so nice, that the unbound neck looks too plain and cheap in comparison. If Agile, Epiphone, and a host of other guitar's can bind the neck, I'm sure Godin could too.

TG
 

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There is a great video (which I cannot find of course!) that claims the "more money to produce" argument is simply the end result of marketing product-line differentiation. Yes, the most expensive models tend to have bound necks but this isn't really because of added manufacturing costs. When you think about it, we are talking about two pieces of plastic glued to the edge of the fret board.

I just find the Godin stuff looks so nice and has a great number of styles and finishes. They are so nice, that the unbound neck looks too plain and cheap in comparison. If Agile, Epiphone, and a host of other guitar's can bind the neck, I'm sure Godin could too.

TG
Look at the lower-end guitars from those companies and see the cost difference for the ones without binding. An Epiphone Les Paul Standard is $719 at Long & McQuade, while the Studio is $489. There are several differences between them, one of which is the binding and inlays on the fretboard. I'm not saying the binding it the principal reason for the cost increase, but no matter if it's just "two pieces of plastic glued to the edge of the fret board", extra steps in manufacturing cost money.

Robert Godin seems to want to position his guitars as high quality, great value guitars, so something like binding, which does increase the cost and time of production, he seems to save for the higher-end models like the Summit, Montreal Premiere and these new custom shop models. It adds extra steps to the process, which is time and money for a company with tight margins like Godin who balance cost/quality so carefully.

All that said, I agree it would be nice to see more of these models from Godin, but we have to be willing to pay a little extra for the bling.
 
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