The Canadian Guitar Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I figured its about time to dust off my woodworking equipment and make some new dust
So, I'm teaching my kidlets how to build a guitar from scratch. It should be fun



Picked up my 8/4 stock ash from Windsor Plywood about 3 months ago. I had cut and sealed the ends to prevent slitting until we were ready for them. 3 Tele's will emerge soon.

OK, so I've discovered that the biggest challenge of this project is getting all three teenagers together at the same time :rolleyes:

On to the next step... squaring up the edges to glue up the halves. Only one of the offspring was brave enough to be in front of a camera lens.




All the squared up blanks being matched up. 2 of these guitars are going to be solid color... a shame to cover up such pretty grain :(
Oh, well, at least the grain will be there if they decide to refinish them in the future.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,980 Posts
Cool. You mention 'if they decide to refinish them'. Are these builds for others, like a custom build? Or are they for 'internal consumption' (family members)?


PS: still loving my Reilanders in my Strat. I've tried a few other sets but keep going back to them as my reference standard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cool. You mention 'if they decide to refinish them'. Are these builds for others, like a custom build? Or are they for 'internal consumption' (family members)?


PS: still loving my Reilanders in my Strat. I've tried a few other sets but keep going back to them as my reference standard.
Glad you like them :)

These guitars are for family consumption. My one daughter wants a solid baby blue, and my other daughter wants solid white so that she can do a mural on it. One son's going for a burst red with black highlights. There is another son who is a few steps ahead of us. He made a strat body in woodworking, and is waiting for us to catch up :) He's still up in the air about his finish.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,223 Posts
Glad you like them :)

These guitars are for family consumption. My one daughter wants a solid baby blue, and my other daughter wants solid white so that she can do a mural on it. One son's going for a burst red with black highlights. There is another son who is a few steps ahead of us. He made a strat body in woodworking, and is waiting for us to catch up :) He's still up in the air about his finish.
3 teles and a strat. Might as well paint it black and call it Sheep
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
But...where are you going to find pick-ups? Huh?
I have no idea... I'm open to suggestions :D

I'm actually going to have them wind their own.

3 teles and a strat. Might as well paint it black and call it Sheep
Ha! that's perfect! it would certainly fit his personality :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,584 Posts
What you are building with your kids (not the guitar), is priceless.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MReilander

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,223 Posts
I have no idea... I'm open to suggestions :D

I'm actually going to have them wind their own.


Ha! that's perfect! it would certainly fit his personality :)
You sound like an awesome father. There's nothing better than teaching your kids how to do stuff, build stuff, and fix stuff. Anyone can buy stuff.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,980 Posts
You sound like an awesome father. There's nothing better than teaching your kids how to do stuff, build stuff, and fix stuff. Anyone can buy stuff.
I agree. My Dad had me help him trouble shoot old trucks and tractors (non-diesel). Usually, it was spark or fuel problems. So he'd have me hold a sparkplug lead while he turned it over. If I jumped, he knew the problem was the fuel system. LOL


Actually, he had me hold the lead close to the block, looking for a spark - but you know kids and attention spans. I learned after the first time or three.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You sound like an awesome father. There's nothing better than teaching your kids how to do stuff, build stuff, and fix stuff. Anyone can buy stuff.
Well thanks :) It's how I was brought up, I guess. My grandfathers a cabinet maker, and my Dad's a mechanic so I grew up with no shortage of hands on projects. While they kids are learning a skill, it's my hope that the time together is remembered and cherished when I'm old and grey, just as I cherish my memories of working with my Grandfather and Dad.

I agree. My Dad had me help him trouble shoot old trucks and tractors (non-diesel). Usually, it was spark or fuel problems. So he'd have me hold a sparkplug lead while he turned it over. If I jumped, he knew the problem was the fuel system. LOL


Actually, he had me hold the lead close to the block, looking for a spark - but you know kids and attention spans. I learned after the first time or three.
LOL, my dad is very much the same way. The zap happened more to my brother though. A side note... the first car I bought as a teenager was an '86 Shelby Charger with a rod through the engine block. My Dad and I did a full rebuild of the engine and turbo for that vehicle. Because of that project, there are very few issues that I can't diagnose and fix with my vehicles.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,223 Posts
Well thanks :) It's how I was brought up, I guess. My grandfathers a cabinet maker, and my Dad's a mechanic so I grew up with no shortage of hands on projects. While they kids are learning a skill, it's my hope that the time together is remembered and cherished when I'm old and grey, just as I cherish my memories of working with my Grandfather and Dad.



LOL, my dad is very much the same way. The zap happened more to my brother though. A side note... the first car I bought as a teenager was an '86 Shelby Charger with a rod through the engine block. My Dad and I did a full rebuild of the engine and turbo for that vehicle. Because of that project, there are very few issues that I can't diagnose and fix with my vehicles.
My father was a welder and carpenter by trade, and a mechanic for fun. The only thing we don't do ourselves with a vehicle is allignments. Dad taught us, and still teaches us everything we need to know about mechanics, and I handle everything to do with wires.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,980 Posts
I held a bracket for my dad while he welded it in place. He told me not to look. I didn't listen - I just had to see what was going on. Ever had welder's burn? Not nice.

So much good advice my dad gave me that I ignored.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,223 Posts
I held a bracket for my dad while he welded it in place. He told me not to look. I didn't listen - I just had to see what was going on. Ever had welder's burn? Not nice.

So much good advice my dad gave me that I ignored.
Ive had more flashes than I can count. They never get more enjoyable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
Agreed.

Thanks to my dad, I can hold a flashlight like a champ.
Mine taught me that if you lack in "handy" skills make sure your beer fridge is always full.

@MReilander, I love stuff like this, keep us posted as I'm sure the finished products will be neat to see.

By the way, do the kids play guitar or is this strictly a woodworking project?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Mine taught me that if you lack in "handy" skills make sure your beer fridge is always full.

@MReilander, I love stuff like this, keep us posted as I'm sure the finished products will be neat to see.

By the way, do the kids play guitar or is this strictly a woodworking project?
One (with the strat body) has been playing for about 8 years. The others are just getting into it.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top