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Discussion Starter #1
It seems every time I switch to a new instructor I spend the first couple months undoing what the last guy taught me. This time its the C chord.

We all know its played;
2B7C50D0-7562-49F4-BAA9-5E51C080EC99.png

But the last guy got me playing it;

A6EFD75F-001B-4A63-BD17-1BD00BF16A07.png

I like it that way but we can see its actually a C/G. The new guy wants me to play it the normal way.
I like the fuller sound. What say you guys? What if I keep playing it that way? Will other musicians shun, bully, and ostricize me? Will I go blind? Will I rot in hell? Enquiring minds want to know.
 

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You have a) precision in communication and learning, and b) creativity and “pizzaz”. Both are necessary. When you intend to play an open C chord in the conventional sense, play the open C chord in the conventional sense. When you intend to play open C/G, play open C/G. The decision what chord or inversion you play is yours. The decision what to call them is not.
 

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That is : You can use altered chords to spice your music, but you have to name chords correctly.
 

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Use whichever you prefer unless the piece of music specifically calls for one or the other. The important thing is...you realize they are DIFFERENT chords. The C/G is actually a 2nd inversion (the 5th is the first note played) of the C chord.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Use whichever you prefer unless the piece of music specifically calls for one or the other. The important thing is...you realize they are DIFFERENT chords. The C/G is actually a 2nd inversion (the 5th is the first note played) of the C chord.
Well, I know they are different now. I just thought it it was an alternate shape until I used an online chord finder.
 

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It is important to know how chords sound with different inversions and useful to know the names and theory behind them, especially if you’re learning a new song or writing a song. That said, when I’m actually playing I rarely think about this stuff.
 

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It's not entirely clear what you are asking. C/G is not the same thing as a straight up C, but it could certainly take the place of a straight up C in almost any imaginable situation. If you like the way it sounds, then why not?

I think many of us tend to substitute our favourite 'flavours' of chords fairly frequently, just based on preference and experience.

My favourite C chord is technically a Cadd2 (or a Cadd9, depending on you'd like to look at it), played as x32030 or x32033.

I use that chord a lot, even when the song asks for a straight up C major chord.

Am I "doing it wrong"?

I don't think so. I like the way it sounds and it's easy to send my fingers into that position after 30-something years of doing it.
 

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I was taught the C/G at the same time I was taught the regular C. I’ve never had anyone tell me not to use C/G. It is very much a C chord to my ears.

I can imagine that if you were going to be moving the bass around, C, B, Bb, that you would want to have the C root.

It may seem like an odd request, but he may have a reason for teaching that way, something mapped out for a future lesson.
 

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How long have you been playing?

How many teachers have you had?

Why did you stop going to previous teachers?

What have you been taught?

How long have you been going to this new guy?

What is the current guy teaching you?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
How long have you been playing?
Off and on for 26 years. (Mostly off)

How many teachers have you had?
Three over the last 5 years

Why did you stop going to previous teachers?
I have a buggered ring finger that's taken better part of three years to heal. Then the second teacher died of an overdose a couple months back.

What have you been taught?
Mostly beginner stuff, but I've asked for more theory. I like to know how things work. I started the Major Scale last week. Hopefully finally getting into some weedly weedly.

How long have you been going to this new guy?
About a month.

What is the current guy teaching you?
It's a group lesson through work. So he's catering to about 6 of us (all different levels). But mainly teaching us songs and then the theory behind them. Working in new strumming patterns and how keys work etc. My finger isn't quite 100% so I'll give it until the Fall before going back to private lessons (Hopefully).
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It's not entirely clear what you are asking. C/G is not the same thing as a straight up C, but it could certainly take the place of a straight up C in almost any imaginable situation. If you like the way it sounds, then why not?

I think many of us tend to substitute our favourite 'flavours' of chords fairly frequently, just based on preference and experience.

My favourite C chord is technically a Cadd2 (or a Cadd9, depending on you'd like to look at it), played as x32030 or x32033.

I use that chord a lot, even when the song asks for a straight up C major chord.

Am I "doing it wrong"?

I don't think so. I like the way it sounds and it's easy to send my fingers into that position after 30-something years of doing it.
I like the Cadd9 too! Especially with the G.
 

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I almost never play the C/G, but often use my ring finger to alternate a bass line between the C and G notes. For C chords I use a few variations, depending on convenience and feel really.

X32010 (std open C)
X32033
Xx201x
Xx555x
X7555x (very often)
X35553 (A shape Bar)
X3555x
8 10 10 9 8 8 (E shape bar)
8 x 10 9 8 8 (thumb over version of above)
X x 10 9 8 8 (F shape)
X x x 12 13 12 ( D shape triad)
X323010 C7

Play with them all and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Some may disagree. I like Yousician. Best value for the buck. And the family plan gets 4 instruments

I did the original version called “Guitarbots”. Was a lot of fun. I’m also doing the Fender Play lessons. But so far they’re too easy. I should skip ahead but don’t want to miss anything.
 

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There are more ways to play C than there are to skin a cat. The second way you mentioned (332010) is handy when you are playing fingerstyle with an alternating bass, for example. Of course, you may want to get yer ringer finger jumping tween the A and E strings, or it may sound right to just grab the whole chord and hold it.

As a jazz guy, I don't use either grip that often in a jazz setting, but I like C(add 2):

xx5530
xx2533
xx5758
xx.14.12.13.10
 
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