The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,811 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
25 years ago today, I started working at my present company.

Although I had previously been in a middle management position at another company which went belly up, I started with this company as an hourly assembly worker.

Within 18 months I achieved my first fundamental goal, which was to extract myself from the CAW. I applied for and was promoted to a production supervisor position.

After five years of that I went back into sales and have been there ever since.

Now I manage about $120 million USD in annual sales and I spend much of my time traveling.

I'm sitting in a Hampton Inn near Columbus, Ohio which is about as normal as it gets for me.

Tonight I'll have a nice Japanese dinner and throw back some sake with my boss and my assistant.

I have to say I'm happy and fortunate to be doing what I'm doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,678 Posts
That beats getting an e-mail from Linkedin offering a link to congratulate you on a work anniversary. But happy 25th. Not many these days who can say they worked for a company for that many years, and are still employed by them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,209 Posts
I'm in my 28th and last year with this company. At least, that's the rumor I'm hearing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Milkman

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,811 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
That beats getting an e-mail from Linkedin offering a link to congratulate you on a work anniversary. But happy 25th. Not many these days who can say they worked for a company for that many years, and are still employed by them.
Yeah LinkedIn get's the month but not the date.

The funny thing is, the person who was my boss when I first started 25 years ago, is now my subordinate.

And yes, I think it's a rarity these days for anyone to stay with one company for so long.

I'm hoping I can finish my working career with them.

Last night they gave me a nice watch, but honestly most days I feel like I've been pampered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
I'm coming up on 29 years with my company. Had it's ups and downs over the years but at this point I think I'll just ride it out there for another 7 or 8 years then retire.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,811 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I'm coming up on 29 years with my company. Had it's ups and downs over the years but at this point I think I'll just ride it out there for another 7 or 8 years then retire.
I can’t imagine working ANYwhere without some ups and downs.

Congrats for biting your tongue when you needed to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,678 Posts
Some of the blather that accompanies any discussion of millenials will often note that "they" tend to be less attached or loyal to any given employer; presumably bopping around from job to job.

Some of that is because employers themselves can be every bit as fickle these days (and often motivated in their HRM practices by sudden shifts in shareholder attitude).
Some of that is because employers are expecting post-secondary education for more jobs, and such graduates are scrambling to address their debtload, skipping around in search of salaries that will tackle it quicker. )I'd actually like to see some research on student debtload and attitudes towards employment by recent grads over the last two decades.)
It is also a maxim in HRM that those whose roots are shallow tend to blow away quickly. If someone has 3-5 years tenure in an organization, they tend to stick around. It's the newcomers that tend to leave, and many of those newcomers are millenials; making it a tenure, rather than generational thing (see Mitchell & Lee's "job embeddedness" model and research).
I suspect as well that more and more employers are disinclined to develop junior staff, preferring instead that such hires come ready off-the-shelf, with all needed training provided by school at the hire's expense; one of the reasons why employers whine about universities and colleges not providing the workforce they need.

So yeah, it is not common for an employee-employer relationship to last 25 or more years.

As well, to put a different spin on it, employee tenure tends to be a function of alternative possibilities. As so many here can attest, the cornucopia of guitar gear out there tends to induce G.A.S. and similar sort of fickleness. I'm constantly amazed by how quickly some folks here go through amps, pedals, and guitars. As the population becomes concentrated in a few large urban centres, more and more people find themselves in a context that holds many other job possibilities. When I used to survey public servants about staffing practices, we would ask them how many job applications they had put in at the moment. The people applying around the most were young people and those with a year or two of tenure within the organization, and those in the large urban centers. Those working in the north, smaller municipalities, or rural areas were not as aggressively pursuing other jobs, mostly because there weren't all that many other jobs to pursue.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,811 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Some of the blather that accompanies any discussion of millenials will often note that "they" tend to be less attached or loyal to any given employer; presumably bopping around from job to job.

Some of that is because employers themselves can be every bit as fickle these days (and often motivated in their HRM practices by sudden shifts in shareholder attitude).
Some of that is because employers are expecting post-secondary education for more jobs, and such graduates are scrambling to address their debtload, skipping around in search of salaries that will tackle it quicker. )I'd actually like to see some research on student debtload and attitudes towards employment by recent grads over the last two decades.)
It is also a maxim in HRM that those whose roots are shallow tend to blow away quickly. If someone has 3-5 years tenure in an organization, they tend to stick around. It's the newcomers that tend to leave, and many of those newcomers are millenials; making it a tenure, rather than generational thing (see Mitchell & Lee's "job embeddedness" model and research).
I suspect as well that more and more employers are disinclined to develop junior staff, preferring instead that such hires come ready off-the-shelf, with all needed training provided by school at the hire's expense; one of the reasons why employers whine about universities and colleges not providing the workforce they need.

So yeah, it is not common for an employee-employer relationship to last 25 or more years.

As well, to put a different spin on it, employee tenure tends to be a function of alternative possibilities. As so many here can attest, the cornucopia of guitar gear out there tends to induce G.A.S. and similar sort of fickleness. I'm constantly amazed by how quickly some folks here go through amps, pedals, and guitars. As the population becomes concentrated in a few large urban centres, more and more people find themselves in a context that holds many other job possibilities. When I used to survey public servants about staffing practices, we would ask them how many job applications they had put in at the moment. The people applying around the most were young people and those with a year or two of tenure within the organization, and those in the large urban centers. Those working in the north, smaller municipalities, or rural areas were not as aggressively pursuing other jobs, mostly because there weren't all that many other jobs to pursue.
Thanks, as always for the scholarly and thoughtful post.

I get one or two offers every year.

Loyalty has value to me as long as it’s a two way street.
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
Top